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Logical Partitions

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ALSO CALLED: LP LPAR, Partitions, Dynamic Logical Partitioning, eServer i5 Dynamic Logical Partitioning, LPAR, Logic Programming and Automated Reasoning, Logical Partitioning
DEFINITION: A logical partition (LPAR) is the division of a computer's processor s, memory , and storage into multiple sets of resources so that each set of resources can be operated independently with its own operating system instance and application s. The number of logical partitions that can be created depends on the system's processor model and resources available. Typically, partitions are used for different  … 
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Logical Partitions Reports
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Advances in Data Warehouse Performance
sponsored by IBM
WHITE PAPER: Learn how DB2 can help you meet the demands of business intelligence by reducing query response time from hours to seconds, supporting real time data warehousing, and optimizing your storage while lowering operating costs.
Posted: 28 Nov 2007 | Published: 01 May 2007

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Virtualization: Management Ascendant
sponsored by Hewlett-Packard Company
WHITE PAPER: Access this paper to learn more about the potential, but avoidable issues related to virtualization.
Posted: 05 Dec 2006 | Published: 09 Nov 2006

Hewlett-Packard Company

Essentials Guide to Table Partitioning and Data Lifecycle Management
sponsored by EMC Corporation
WHITE PAPER: Database partitioning provides improvements to maintenance and performance. This paper examines the benefits of partitioning a database into smaller, workable chunks, rather than an entire monolithic piece.
Posted: 02 May 2006 | Published: 01 Mar 2006

EMC Corporation
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LOGICAL PARTITIONS DEFINITION (continued): … A logical partition (LPAR) is the division of a computer's processor s, memory , and storage into multiple sets of resources so that each set of resources can be operated independently with its own operating system instance and application s. The number of logical partitions that can be created depends on the system's processor model and resources available. Typically, partitions are used for different purposes such as database operation or client/server operation or to separate test and production environments. Each partition can communicate with the other partitions as if the other partition is in a separate machine. Logical partitioning was first studied by IBM in 1976 and later introduced by Amdahl and then IBM. Hitachi and Sun Microsystems also use forms of logical partitioning. Today, both IBM's S/390 (now z/900 Series) and AS/400 products support logical partitioning.
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