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Computer Weekly 8 November 2011: Read this week's issue of the UK's leading technology publication, with the news, analysis and opinion that matters to IT managers.

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How to configure Mac OS X Server


In the previous article in this series, we showed you how to secure a Mac using the functions built into its operating system, OS X.


These functions range from simple password protection and patch management through to full-disk encryption.


However, these are not the only security functions available. Indeed, OS X has a whole security and management infrastructure available for administrators called Managed Preferences, which can be managed most easily using OS X Server.


Capable of running on any Mac that can run OS X 10.8, it is priced at £13.99 for unlimited client connections, so easily affordable.


Apple also sells a customised Mac mini desktop computer with improved storage capabilities, which comes with OS X Server installed for small and medium-sized companies, as well as workgroups, which want a dedicated machine.


In this article, we’ll show you just a couple of the security features of OS X Server: global password policies and data loss prevention




  •  Configuring Mac OS X Server for the first time
  • Types of user account
  • Setting up a global password policy
  • Creating a network user
  • Managing preferences
  • Binding clients
  • Next steps



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These are also closely related to: "Computer Weekly 8 November 2011: Read this week's issue of the UK's leading technology publication, with the news, analysis and opinion that matters to IT managers."

  • The Demise in Effectiveness of Signature and Heuristic Based Antivirus



    Today there is an urgent emphasis being placed by vendors on the need for antivirus to be installed on an increasing number of computing platforms used within organisations.


    The aim of this is to satisfy risk controls while also forming part of an organisation’s technical information security strategy.


    This market demand for antivirus has led to a number of security products which do little to actually protect the user, their data or the organisation.


    This paper outlines why, in our opinion, the antivirus based approach adopted by organisations to technical risk management, not only fails to provide the protection it is designed to, but it in fact increases an organisation’s susceptibility to attack.


    Overall our view is that signature based antivirus is tackling a problem we had 20 years ago and is not relevant to many of today’s threats for businesses, although we feel it still has a role in protecting the consumer. As a result, NCC Group’s opinion is that security budgets might be more effectively directed


    Click on the button below to download this report



    NCC Group is a global information assurance specialist.

  • Smart cards: security risks



    Version 3 of the Java Card smart card specification, released in March 2008, overhauled the technical architecture of the smart card.


    The Connected Edition of the specification introduced a significantly enhanced execution environment and a new virtual machine. It includes new network-oriented features, support for web applications with new Servlet APIs, multi-threading and support for applets with extended and advanced capabilities.


    Such features add complexity to the smart card platform and the hosted applications, increasing the attack surface and introducing a multitude of vulnerabilities. The security models, testing and risk management programmes must cater for these susceptibilities.


    In this article we consider the new features of the Connected Edition and identify some of the security problems that developers need to be aware of.


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    Royal Holloway Information Security Thesis Series

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